Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Cairo, Egypt Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011.

Antiquities Chief Zahi Hawass addresses Egyptian museum workers as they stage a protest outside the Supreme Council of Antiquities in the upscale neighborhood of Zamalek in Cairo, Egypt Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. In an indication of state employee unrest, the museum workers demanded higher wages and criticized the practices of former Minister of Culture Farouq Hosni.









Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters are seen next to Army tanks and armored vehicles near Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting.







Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak sits in his office, during a meeting with Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Alexander Saltanov, at the Presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. The boldest challenge ever to President Hosni Mubarak's three decades of authoritarian rule has so far failed in its singular goal to oust him immediately. And after initial euphoria over their defiance of a state once thought impregnable, protesters are increasingly uneasy that Mubarak or leaders he has chosen may manage to hang on to power. Egyptian foreign minister Ahmed Aboul Gheit, at forground.





Egyptian anti-Mubarak protester next to Army tanks and armored vehicles protecting the Egyptian museum, in the background, near Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting.






An Egyptian anti-Mubarak protester reads the newspaper next to an Army tank near Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheets.





Egyptian museum workers stage a protest outside the Supreme Council of Antiquities in the upscale neighborhood of Zamalek in Cairo, Egypt Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. In an indication of state employee unrest, the museum workers demanded higher wages and criticized the practices of former Minister of Culture Farouq Hosni, and argued with Antiquities Chief Zahi Hawass who came out to address them. Posters in Arabic read "No to corruption, no to oppression, Farouq Abdel-Salam", "Steadfastness, steadfastness" and "Increasing pay".





Egyptian women hold Egyptian flags as they walk towards Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting.






Egyptian museum workers stage a protest outside the Supreme Council of Antiquities in the upscale neighborhood of Zamalek in Cairo, Egypt Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. In another indication of state employee unrest, dozens of museum workers demanding higher wages and criticizing the practices of former Minister of Culture Farouq Hosni staged a protest in front of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, arguing with Antiquities Chief Zahi Hawass who came out to address them, and pushing past doormen into the building. Posters in Arabic read "No to corruption, no to oppression, Farouq Abdel-Salam", "Steadfastness, steadfastness" and "Increasing pay".






 Egyptian people stand outside a closed food fast restaurant near Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting.








Tourists take a tour around one of the Pyramids of Giza, near Cairo, Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. The Pyramids, Egypt's most famous tourist attraction, reopened to tourists on Wednesday, as anti-government demonstrations entered their third week. Tens of thousands of foreigners have fled Egypt amid the chaos, raising concerns about the economic impact of the protests.




Egyptian protesters sleep in front of the Egyptian Parliament in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. Around 2,000 protesters waved huge flags outside the parliament, located several blocks from Tahrir Square, where they moved a day earlier in the movement's first expansion out of the square. They chanted slogans demanding the dissolving of the legislature, where almost all the seats are held by the ruling party. Arabic read " a report to prosecutor general: Mubarak and his family wealth 70 billion dollar".


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