Saturday, April 18, 2009

FARMERS PICS FROM ZIMBABWE.......18/04/09....Part 1...

Zimbabwean white farmers stand outside the farms which have been seized by armed youths in Chegutu 120km south west of Harare on April 17, 2009. Farmers in the area told officials that there had been disruptions on 17 farms since January. President Robert Mugabe on April 17, 2009 denied that farm invasions were taking place in Zimbabwe but vowed to continue land reforms, as the country's unity government launched a probe into fresh grabs.





Zimbabwean farmer Brian Bronkhoust looks his cattle in his farm which was seized by armed youths in Chegutu 120km south west of Harare on April 17, 2009. Farmers in the area told officials that there had been disruptions on 17 farms since January. President Robert Mugabe on April 17, 2009 denied that farm invasions were taking place in Zimbabwe but vowed to continue land reforms, as the country's unity government launched a probe into fresh grabs.





Zimbabwean farmer Ben Freeth looks at rotten mangoes at his farm as his normal farm operations were disrupted by armed youths seizing farms in Chegutu 120km south west of Harare on April 17, 2009. Farmers in the area told officials that there had been disruptions on 17 farms since January. President Robert Mugabe on April 17, 2009 denied that farm invasions were taking place in Zimbabwe but vowed to continue land reforms, as the country's unity government launched a probe into fresh grabs.





Two men stand by the the gates of a farm which they seized from white farmers in Chegutu 120km south west of Harare on April 17, 2009. Farmers in the area told officials that there had been disruptions on 17 farms since January.





Farmer Ben Freeth, stands among rotting mangoes at his farm in Chegutu, about 120 kilometres west of Harare, Friday, April, 17, 2009. The mangoes meant for export could not leave his farm after it was occupied by suspected Zanu pf supporters who disrupted farming activities and threatened to take over the farm if Freeth continued to challenge the government's controversial land reform programme. Zimbabwe's Deputy Prime Minister Arrthur Mutambara was on a fact finding mission at the farm in an effort by the Zimbabwean government to bring sanity to the farming sector.





An armed youth mans the gates of a farm which they seized from white farmers in Chegutu 120km south west of Harare on April 17, 2009. Farmers in the area told officials that there had been disruptions on 17 farms since January. President Robert Mugabe on April 17, 2009 denied that farm invasions were taking place in Zimbabwe but vowed to continue land reforms, as the country's unity government launched a probe into fresh grabs.





Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe's election poster hangs on the wall near an orange field at Etheredge farm in Chegutu, 100km (62 miles) west of the capital Harare, April 17, 2009. Mugabe made a strong appeal for national unity and urged Zimbabweans to work together to end Western sanctions, in a sign of improving relations with his old rivals in the power-sharing coalition.





A Zimbabwean armed gate guard watches as visitor Brian Bronkhost enters Violetsvale Farm in Chegutu, 110km (62 miles) west of the capital Harare, April 17, 2009. Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe made a strong appeal for national unity and urged Zimbabweans to work together to end Western sanctions, in a sign of improving relations with his old rivals in the power-sharing coalition.





 A Zimbabwean white farmer James Etherredge opens the gate at the Etheredge Farm in Chegutu, 100km (62 miles) west of the capital Harare, April 17, 2009.


 A Zimbabwean white farmer Ben Freeth inspects rotten mangoes at Mt. Carmel Farm in Chegutu, 110km (68 miles) west of the capital Harare, April 17, 2009. Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe made a strong appeal for national unity and urged Zimbabweans to work together to end Western sanctions, in a sign of improving relations with his old rivals in the power-sharing coalition.





Zimbabwean deputy Prime minister Arthur Mutambara, centre, addresses journalists with Ben Freeth, left, at Freeth's farm in Chegutu, about 120 kilometres west of Harare, Friday, April, 17, 2009. Freeth's farm was occupied by suspected Zanu pf supporters who disrupted farming activities and threatened to take over the farm if Freeth continued to challenge the government's controversial land reform programme .Mutambara was on a fact finding mission in an effort by the Zimbabwean government to bring sanity to the farming sector.





Zimbabwean deputy Prime Minister Arthur Mutambara, right, addresses journalists while Ben Freeth, left who looks on at his farm in Chegutu, about 120 kilometres west of Harare, Friday, April, 17, 2009.


2 comments:

This is what I love about blogging - it is one of the tools, that gives ordinary South Africans an idea of what is actually happening on the ground.

Every now and then we'll get an idea via the SA press but pictures like that brings it into perspective for us. I know we have some bloggers on Bundublog who cover the Zimbabwean situation as well which you should check out if you get a chance.

Thanks for the insight. Hopefully Zim is turning the corner.

This insanity has to stop.

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